Community & Diversity

  • Global Perspective

    The freshman class typically consists of 160 students (10%) from countries around the world.

  • Celebrating Heritage and Identity

    First-year students experience cultural activites from across the globe including salsa dancing lessons

  • Living in a Diverse Community

    Entryway communities are microcosms of the entire first-year class, representing the diversity of the student body

  • Consider: Who Am I?

    During Opening Days, freshmen consider how their identities and experiences have shaped them


Based on the conviction that Harvard is a sum greater than its parts, the Freshman Dean’s Office sponsors a variety of activities, beginning during Opening Days and continuing throughout the year, designed to build community among the first-year class and highlight its rich diversity.

  • Community Conversations offer students a chance to meet with their entryway, faculty, and administrators to talk about identity and diversity.

All of these activities are designed to help first-year students get to know one another and build connections within and across multiple forms of diversity such as nationality, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, physical ability, and religion. If you have a suggestion for an event, please contact the Director for Community and Diversity Programs.

Specialty Proctors

In addition to their regular duties in the entryways, specialty proctors are responsible for providing class-wide programming in a variety of areas including race relations, LGBTQ life, public service, and CAARE (consent, assault awareness, and relationship education).

College-wide Resources

Beyond the Freshman Dean’s Office, a variety of offices at Harvard support students as they contemplate and engage in the rich diversity of the College community. For instance, the Harvard College Women’s Center and Office of BGLTQ Student Life focus on issues of gender and sexuality, while the Harvard Foundation for Intercultural and Race Relations promotes dialogue and understanding around race and ethnicity. The Director of Diversity and Inclusion Programs supports all student communities, including first generation and undocumented students.The Harvard Chaplains, located in Memorial Church, support the diverse religious life at Harvard, and the Accessible Education Office provides academic, extracurricular, and housing accommodations to students with disabilities.